Sony Ercisson K850i

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Man4Utd

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Joined: 4 Oct 06
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 258

Post #16 February 2008, 10:53
i was thinking bout gettin k850i phone for nxt yr what u pplz think bout this phone?

This post has been edited 1 time. The last edit took place 06.02.08, 11:01.

thamatt

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Joined: 10 Dec 07
From: Denmark
Posts: 3

Post #26 February 2008, 12:31
i thinkt its great i have it

Sansierro

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Joined: 30 Dec 06
From: Iraq
Posts: 826

Post #36 February 2008, 20:47
its great Camera.......i dont think its great in general

j301988

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Joined: 16 Jul 06
From: Philippines
Posts: 403

Post #47 February 2008, 01:51
It's one of "so-so" phones out there. The camera is pretty decent for a camera phone but there are still a lot of mobile camera phones better than this. One good thing about this is the Cybershot feature which, unfortunately, other mobile phones don't have. It also needs a lot of improvement in Video Recording as it shoots like 18th century videocams do. JMTC

Quitter

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Post #57 February 2008, 16:20

Quote of user: j301988

It's one of "so-so" phones out there. The camera is pretty decent for a camera phone but there are still a lot of mobile camera phones better than this. One good thing about this is the Cybershot feature which, unfortunately, other mobile phones don't have. It also needs a lot of improvement in Video Recording as it shoots like 18th century videocams do. JMTC


Yeah but still of one the best phones on the market.................!

Man4Utd

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Joined: 4 Oct 06
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 258

Post #69 February 2008, 13:19
true it best fone of diz year cud be

adnansanni

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Joined: 28 Jul 04
From: Bangladesh
Posts: 413

Post #710 February 2008, 07:09
Are you talking about for next year or this year??
If it is next year then K850i will be rock.
But in this year it isn't.

Quitter

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Post #810 February 2008, 07:36
In the world of high tech, you don't want your product to come out a month after your competitor's, let alone 6 months. That's the itchy-scratchy position Sony Ericsson finds themselves in with the K850i coming out a half a year after the flagship Nokia N95. In fact, just before the K850i's release, Nokia also managed to release two revisions of the original N95: the N95-3 for the US market and the N95 8 gig. Ouch. But is it really that bad?



Nokia and Sony Ericsson have been in a high end camera phone contest for the past two years-- we had the 3 megapixel autofocus wars in the summer of 2006 between the Nokia N73 and the Sony Ericsson K790i (and K800i). And now we have the 5 megapixel autofocus battle of late 2007: the N95 vs. the just-released K850i. We think the 6 month later intro isn't such a bad thing for a variety of reasons, including 1) the two phones target different users: smartphone to the max vs. elegant feature phone, 2) Nokia always needs a few months and firmware updates to iron out the imaging gremlins 3) once import prices settle, the K850i will be a significantly lower priced device than the feature-laden N95 models.



The Sony Ericsson K850i is a quad band GSM unlocked phone with US 3G, and that's a big deal: with Sony Ericsson imports, we've been lucky to get the US 850MHz band for GSM, let alone US 3G. The phone is sold by online retailers and importers, but currently isn't offered by a US carrier (there are rumors that AT&T might carry it sometime in the future). The K850i has triband UMTS/HSDPA 3G that will work anywhere in the world 3G service is available, and GSM/EDGE/GPRS that will work anywhere in the world GSM is available. The phone will work with AT&T and T-Mobile in the US, though the 3G makes it particularly attractive to AT&T customers.

This is a K series Cybershot phone, and that puts the camera on center stage. The 5 megapixel camera has an autofocus lens, automatic lens cover and a Xenon flash. There's 16x digital zoom, Sony Ericsson's BestPic feature, image and video stabilization and red eye reduction. Fancy stuff for a camera phone, and in fact, the K850i, a bit more than the beloved Nokia N95, makes us want to leave our dedicated point-and-shoot camera at home.

Though not a Walkman phone (Sony Ericsson's other line of specialized phones gleaned from their joint venture with Sony), the K850i boasts strong music playback skills with stereo output through the included earbud headset and A2DP stereo Bluetooth headphones, Megabass, DRM support and an FM radio. To store music (along with those big photos and videos taken with the camera) there's 40 megs of internal memory and even better both a Memory Stick Micro M2 slot and a microSD card slot for cards up to 4 gigs in capacity.

For those considering an upgrade from the Sony Ericsson K790, K800 or K810, the K850 offers a brighter, larger QVGA display along with the significant camera bump and 3G. There's an accelerometer than senses phone orientation and switches to landscape mode when in multimedia applications and three touch sensitive keys, also new for the K850i. And overall, the K850i looks lovely and much more modern than its predecessors.

Design and Ergonomics

The K850i strikes us as lightly updated K800i that looks more modern and clean. It's still got the K series basic candy bar design, and the phone's size hasn't changed significantly. The back hump from old Cybershot phones is thankfully a thing of the past, and the K850i has a flat back with a piano black finish that looks simply lovely and camera-like though it attracts fingerprints like the plague. The K850i inherits the K810i's little number keys, but these are square rather than round and a bit rubbery for better dialing traction. Clearly, Sony Ericsson had to cut down on the keypad and d-pad real estate to avoid enlarging the phone while increasing display size. The little number keys look like misery but they're not quite that bad for dialing (texting isn't fun). It's definitely not as easy to dial or text compared to the Nokia N95 or other more normally designed phones, but it's usable and the wide berth between keys helps. The keys are labeled with western numbers and letters and no asian characters on our Hong Kong import phone.



The d-pad isn't a normal one-piece d-pad with center action button. Rather it's an oblong ring that surrounds the 2 and 5 keys. That's it, just the ring and no center action button. The context sensitive touch sensitive buttons just below the display become the action buttons, which means you must navigate with the d-pad then slide your finger to the correct soft key. That sounds like a big usability no-no, but in practice it worked quite well and I like it quite a bit.


The touch sensitive keys have caused a lot of pre-release chatter, with folks wondering exactly how they work and if they work. Happily, they work extremely well, and after 5 minutes, we'd mastered them and come to like them. The electrostatic touch sensitive keys are marked with tiny white dots, but don't try to zone in and touch them exactly, which would indeed be difficult to do. To use them, press your finger lightly over them with your finger extending onto the bottom of the display where the context sensitive labels appear (it almost feels as if the bottom of the display is in fact touch-sensitive). This comes naturally, and works with near 100% accuracy. The only drawback is that we found ourselves forgetting the rest of the display wasn't touch sensitive! The center soft key is usually the one that replaces the d-pad center action, and it's fairly easy to slide a finger up past the d-pad to press the soft key without too much extra motion (nor did we find ourselves accidentally hitting it, it does take a bit of thought and effort to activate the touch sensitive control).

The keypad numbers and d-pad ring are backlit in white, and the when the camera is on, the shutter button lights up with a thin blue LED line (there's also a blue LED ring that surrounds the lens which lights up briefly when the camera is turned on). To take photos, you hold the phone in landscape mode with the 3,6,9, and # key row up and 4 icons illuminate in blue (on per key) as these become camera settings shortcut buttons. The phone is available in two color schemes: Luminous Green which is black with green accents and Velvet Blue which is black with blue and light silver accents. The black and green model is black with a thin, shiny green line of trim running around the sides and the d-pad ring is green. The blue model has light silver sides with a blue trim line and the d-pad ring is blue.



On most phones, the battery lives under a door on the back. The back comprises the camera on the K850i, and is not removable. Instead, the battery loads via a door on the bottom edge, similar to slim point-and-shoot cameras-- cool!. The SIM and memory cards also load here, and you need not remove the battery to swap a memory card. Also on the bottom edge, beside the battery door you'll find the Sony Ericsson Fast Port connector for the charger and headphones (sorry, no 2.5 or 3.5mm headphone jack).



On the back you will find the lens with clear plastic permanent cover over the retractable lens door, the LED pre-focus flash (and flash light for wandering around in the dark), larger Xenon flash and a long slit that is the speaker grille. Within a few weeks, our phone had several specs of dust under the clear plastic cover over the lens, which annoyed us though it didn't effect image quality. The gloss black surface looks simply lovely until quickly and all too easily covered with fingerprints. Fortunately, these wipe off easily.



Phone Features, Data and Reception

The Sony Ericsson K850i is a quad band 850/900/1800/1900MHz GSM phone with EDGE and 3G for data. Even more exciting is the fact it's worldwide 3G, and HSDPA at at. Sony Ericsson confirms that this is indeed triband 850/1800/1900MHz UMTS 3G and HSDPA 3.5G on all three bands. In the US, the phone is currently sold unlocked for use with any GSM carrier (if AT&T does release their version, that version would be locked to AT&T).

We found the K850i to have a bit louder earpiece than the Nokia N95, Sony Ericsson W810i and K800i. It's on par with the Sony Ericsson W580i, but with slightly better voice quality. Voice quality is noticeably better than the N95's, which sounded thinner and more digitized (we tested using the same AT&T SIM in both phones with a 3G connection that uses a higher quality voice codec than GSM). In fact, for both incoming and outgoing voice, the K850i is one of the best: voice is very full and clear with no "what was that?" on either end. Sound with the included stereo earbud headset with inline mic (HPM-62) is also clear and quite loud.

Standard features include speed dial, smart search (when in the home screen enter the first few letters of a name to bring up matching contacts to call or text message them), voice dialing using voice tags (not true speech recognition), caller photo ID and distinctive ringtones (set a specific ringtone for a contact). You can use the included (dull) ringtones or set any MP3, video or recorded audio as a ringtone. Ringer volume is just adequate, and the phone has a very gentle vibrate mode which can be used in conjunction with a ringer or in silent mode.

We tested the phone on AT&T's HSDPA network in the US and averaged download speeds of 330kbit/sec on DSL Reports mobile speed test. That's not hugely impressive when we've seen speeds up to 950k on smartphones and the upper 500's for the N95-3. The web browser and CPU's rendering capabilities likely hamper download speeds when compared to a smartphone. Downloading videos from the web was a fast affair on the other hand, and applications likewise download very quickly.

Camera

Obviously, the 5 megapixel camera with autofocus lens and Xenon flash is the centerpiece of the Cybershot K850i. And it didn't disappoint us, in fact for the first release firmware out the door the camera was stable, and overall did an excellent job of imaging. Those of you who were hoping for a clear winner between the latest versions of the N95 and the SE K850i in our camera battle will be disappointed. It's a toss up-- with each camera winning in different categories. The K850i is the clear winner in usability, which is to say offering a more dedicated camera-like experience. The N95-3 (which runs the latest camera firmware available for the N95 line) is still too slow: it takes several seconds longer for the camera application to launch and be ready for first shot, autofocus times are improved from early N95 releases but is still slower than the SE, and file save times seem interminable compared to the K850i. The SE isn't as fast as a dedicated digital camera, but it's quite usable and you just might manage to catch a fleeting moment that the N95 will assuredly miss.

The K850i can take photos at a maximum 2592 x 1944 resolution in 5MP mode and has a variety of lesser resolutions from 3MP down to VGA. The camera can shoot video at QVGA resolution (320 x 240) at 30 fps, and the N95's superb VGA resolution video wins here. The phone has a hardware slider button that you'll use to select photo, video or playback mode. There's a tiny camera application launcher button that turns the camera on and off as well as controlling the lens cover. When the camera app is running the entire screen becomes the viewfinder and it runs in landscape orientation. The topmost number key row become camera settings buttons and light up in blue.


Photo quality is excellent overall, with more usable data than the K790i and K800i's 3MP images and better exposure (no white haze or washed out effect which we sometimes noticed with the K800i). Colors are accurate, if not sometimes understated and we couldn't find a hint of color cast in outdoor shots. Indoor shots became overly warm as the camera didn't compensate well enough for incandescent lighting in auto exposure mode with the flash on (turning off the flash fixed the problem). Indoor evening shots in poor light were pleasing with good blacks, but surprisingly the N95 managed a more exposed shot (Nokia's weak spot used to be their low light image quality). The K850i's Xenon flash illuminates close subjects very well, but doesn't add much ambient lighting, which means your subject will be decently exposed but awash in a sea of near blackness. For all but dark club shots and outdoor night shots, we recommend experimenting with turning the flash off-- we consistently got brighter and more balanced shots with it off. The camera uses an LED (actually 3 tiny LEDs) to illuminate the scene for focus and fires the power-hungry Xenon flash only when snapping the photo. Should K790i owners upgrade based on the higher resolution camera? That depends on what you do with your photos: 3MP is really plenty good enough for viewing on the average monitor (if you've got a 30" LCD display, that's a different story), and you won't be able to view a 3MP image at 100%, let alone a 5MP image. But if you want to print photos, the extra pixels and sharper images are worth it. From what we can tell, the lens quality hasn't improved.

The camera has a wealth of manual settings for ISO, white balance, flash control, auto/infinity focus, metering mode and 7 scene modes. Sony Ericsson's BestPic feature shoots several shots with varied settings so you can choose the best one, and Photo fix lets you tweak photos you've taken before transferring them to a PC. The camera has 16x digital zoom, but alas no optical zoom (that's still a rarity on camera phones). Though only QVGA resolution, video quality is very good with no jerkiness or blockiness. Colors are strong and accurate


Thats the spec i thinks it good phones

Man4Utd

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Joined: 4 Oct 06
From: United Kingdom
Posts: 258

Post #910 February 2008, 12:24
yeah true man it would be the best phone in the world

zep_soy

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Joined: 31 May 06
From: Philippines
Posts: 11

Post #104 June 2008, 22:10
how about the brightness? i just bought mine recently.. and compared to my old SE w850i.. i think the lcd of the k850i is dimmer

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